Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Submit your writing to the SNL Writing Showcase!

As the term comes to a close, students should consider submitting their excellent final papers, portfolios, or other writing projects to the SNL Writing Showcase. Entries are welcome through April 1, 2015. More details are here:
https://snlapps.depaul.edu/writing/WritingShowcase.html

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Month of Writing Challenge

For more information about the Month of Writing Challenge, see our website: https://depaul.digication.com/snl_month_of_writing_2014


Monday, September 8, 2014

What kind of procrastinator are you?

Based on the research of DePaul's Dr. Joseph Ferrari, Lifehacker created a flowchart to help you decide what type of procrastinator you are. The site also provides a nice synopsis of Ferrari's theories about why procrastinators procrastinate (my personal favorite is why "procrastinators hate procrastinators") and offers some solutions. Check it out! Just don't wait too long.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Save the Date

Coming this October: the Month of Writing Challenge. 

Challenge yourself to write as many words as you can. Your words will count toward a scholarship for the DePaul school of your choice. Check back for more details--including a brand-new website--in September. 

Until then, feel free to contact snlwriting@depaul.edu with questions. 

Monday, July 14, 2014

Free Writing Class at StoryStudio Chicago

StoryStudio Chicago is an organization dedicated to providing a supportive community for writers of all levels, and on Wednesday, August 27, StoryStudio is hosting an open house and free class:  

Join us for coffee, tea, and conversation with other writers, and then stay for Your Life As Fiction, a fun, all-levels free class that will explore what happens when you combine personal experience with your imagination.

What: Open House and Free Class

Where: StoryStudio Chicago, 4043 N. Ravenswood, Chicago, IL 60613 

Cost: Free!

Click here for more details and to RSVP.

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

SNL to Host Author Jacinda Townsend

On Tuesday, July 8, the Africa Diaspora Committee will host novelist Jacinda Townsend, author of St. Monkey.

About Jacinda Townsend:
Jacinda Townsend's debut novel, Saint Monkey (W.W. Norton), follows two girls in 1950's Kentucky as they are raised in hardship, separated by fortune, and reunited through tragedy.  The New York Times says, "What's impressive about this first novel — apart from the startling music of its language — is Ms. Townsend’s willingness to steep her characters in heartache without relief."  Flavorwire says, "Townsend is a fine writer who comes out swinging with this first book, and gives us one of the best debuts of the year so far.  Library Journal, in a starred review, calls her "one to watch."  Jacinda Townsend, a native of Southcentral Kentucky, is a graduate of Harvard University, Duke Law School, and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.  A former Fulbright fellow to Côte d’Ivoire, she has also published nonfiction and short fiction in numerous literary magazines and anthologies.  She teaches at Indiana University and lives in Bloomington with two beautiful children.

Tuesday, July 8, 2014
Loop Campus, Daley 1451
6 to 7 p.m.

Please RSVP to: SNLAfricaDiaspora@depaul.edu

There is a suggested donation for the event:  aluminum pop-can tabs for Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe’s organization in Kenya, Sewing Hope. Last year Sr. Rosemary received an honorary doctorate in Kenya from SNL. She has also been named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World and a CNN Hero.


Monday, June 9, 2014

Finals Week at the Writing Center

The finals week schedule at the University Center for Writing-based Learning is up, and appointments are going fast! If you're wrapping up coursework, polishing an AP or ILP, or putting the finishing touches on a Digication portfolio, make an appointment soon. Click here to log in to the online reservation system, or click here for instructions on how to set up an account. Receptionists can be reached at wcenter@depaul.edu, 312-362-6726 (Loop), or 773-325-4272 (LPC). Please note that the staff will be able to provide information, but they will ask you to create a WCOnline account in order to make appointments.  

The UCWbL's locations are listed below, but don't forget you can make online appointments or request written feedback as well. These options are perfect for online, commuter, or working students. 

Loop Campus
(312) 362-6726
25 E. Jackson (Lewis Center)
Suite 1600

Hours
Monday, June 9, 10am-5pm
Tuesday June 10, 10am-5pm
Wednesday, June 11, 10am-5pm

Lincoln Park Campus
(773) 325-4272
2320 N. Kenmore (Schmitt Academic Center)
SAC 212

Hours
Monday, June 9, 10am-5pm
Tuesday June 10, 10am-5pm
Wednesday, June 11, 10am-5pm

Thursday, May 22, 2014

The New and Improved Style Manuals

Several years ago, the Modern Language Association issued a new edition of the MLA Handbook. The handbook, now in its seventh edition, was revised to better suit academic writing and research in a digital environment. But even though we now regularly write papers that rely entirely on online sources and incorporate a variety of electronic media, not everyone is aware of the changes. 

Here are just a few of the key updates in the seventh edition: 
  • Citations for online sources do not need to include a URL. The rest of the citation provides enough information that the reader will be able to find the source through a search engine or database. Moreover, URLs are not necessarily stable; a link that worked at the time of writing may be dead before a reader sees it. 
  • For in-text citations from online sources like Web sites, there's no need to use a paragraph or section number in place of a page number, unless the source itself is already numbered. 
  • Now that we have an incredible variety of media at our disposal, making the medium of publication clear is important. Citations should indicate whether the source was Print, Web, Radio, Television, DVD, Film, PDF, etc.
  • Computer keyboards have made it much easier to italicize than underline. Anything that used to be underlined, such as book titles, should now be italicized.
For a more complete list of the changes in the seventh edition, click here to download a PDF compiled by Bedford/St. Martin's. 

The APA Publication Manual was also recently revised and published in a sixth edition. Like MLA, APA style now better supports writers working with online sources. (Click here for a brief overview.) Students writing in education, business, psychology, and other social sciences are likely to find APA style more useful, as well as the format used in much of the source material they will encounter in their research.


MLA has always been the preferred style for scholarly writing in the humanities, but since it also provides highly detailed information about using and citing a wide variety of material, it's also appropriate for projects that may include both traditional and nontraditional sources (even Twitter).

Monday, May 19, 2014

Upcoming Incomplete Project Boot Camps


Do you have an incomplete grade? A final project that is dragging on? Finish your missing assignments, ILP, or AP through Writing Boot Camp and attend one or more free, faculty-led sessions. 

The program is designed for SNL students who currently have an incomplete grade on their transcript or students working on writing assignments. Sessions are set up to increase the likelihood students will complete necessary courses to obtain a bachelor’s degree and offer a supportive academic environment, writing assistance, and help with library services so that students can get assignments completed.

You are welcome to sign up for more than one session. 

Naperville
Saturday, May 31, 9:00 am-1:00 pm
150 W. Warrenville Rd., Bld. 200

Oak Forest
Saturday, May 31, 9:00 am-1:00 pm
16333 S. Kilbourn Ave.

Loop
Wednesday, June 4, 5:30-9:00 pm
Saturday, June 7, 9:00 am-1:00 pm
14 E. Jackson, Lab 1325

O’Hare
Saturday, June 7, 9:00am-1:00pm 
8770 W. Bryn Mawr Ave.

To Register: Email snlsa@depaul.edu with your desired session(s).

Items to Bring to Session(s):  Please bring a flash drive, your copy of the incomplete contract if applicable, all prior assignment preparation, including research material, assignment instructions, and assignment writing format (APA/MLA). Please let your faculty mentor know you plan to attend if you are working on an assignment for an incomplete grade.

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Announcing the 2014 Writing Showcase Winners

SNL Writing is proud to announce the winners of the 2014 SNL Writing Showcase. Please congratulate them on their excellent work! The essays will be posted to the Writing Guide over the next few weeks, and the winners will be honored at the Awards Luncheon in June. 

Katie Reginaldi: "In Support of a Church Garden" and "Adventures in the Community Garden"

Ronnie Malley: "Andalusia: A Journey of Music and Cultural Exchange"

Marc Raffa: "Let's Get Bready, To Give Back!" 

Angelique Guinn: "Fundamentalism and the Modern American Woman"

Sarah Bishara: "An Analysis of Employee Perceptions of Motivational Factors in the Workplace" 

Jason Meyer: "Splice of Life: The Beatles and the Tale of Their Tape"

Monday, April 14, 2014

10 Things Parenting Has Taught Me About Writing


by Steffanie Triller Fry

Nine months ago, I gave birth to my first child. For the nine months since, I have been trying to reconcile my identity as a writer with my identity as a parent. When I saw that there was a panel entitled “The Parent-Writer: Can We Really Have It All?” at the annual conference of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs this February, I jumped at the chance to learn how parenting had transformed other authors’ writing. But, the panelists never touched transformation. Mostly, they emphasized the need to get enough time to devote to writing.
I must admit that I smiled when I learned that of the five panelists, all published professional writers, three had one child each and two of them had two children. I think my recent student who parents five children ranging in age from fifteen months to seventeen years and who is currently working on her Advanced Project could tell these panelists a thing or two about being a parent-writer!
The thoughts missing from this panel presentation prompted me to ponder on the ways parenting has affected my own writing, and how it continues to affect the writing that adult students-parents-writers do each day.
            Adult students spend a significant amount of time outside of the classroom on non-academic endeavors. But, research has shown that these non-academic pursuits may enhance the learning that takes place inside of the classroom. Not surprisingly, Graham and Donaldson found in their study of nearly 27,811 college students, approximately two-thirds of whom were over the age of 27, that adult students spend significantly more time involved in off-campus activities (including raising children) than younger students. But significantly, Graham and Donaldson also found that the adult students’ reported academic growth was also greater than younger students’ reported growth across 26 categories, including “Improving writing ability” and “Developing creativity and original ideas” (Table 1.) 
            While a significant subset of the scholarship in the field of rhetoric and composition in the past five years has discussed learning transfer, most of this research has considered how students use the skills they learn in first-year composition in the disciplines and in the field. Little has focused on the way students use prior learning processes when they learn in the composition classroom (Moore 11). One exception is Michelle Navarre Cleary’s “Flowing and Freestyling: Learning from Adult Students about Process Knowledge Transfer.” In this article she considers the ways that adult students Tiffany and Doppel learn in their home and work lives, and how these processes of learning transfer to their academic work. She does not consider, however, whether Tiffany and Doppel are parents, and how their abilities as parents might transfer to their abilities as students.
These studies in learning transfer beg the question: what can parent-students as parent-writers transfer from their learning in the home to their studies outside of the home?
            Though the spaces in which I am parent, writer, teacher, and many other things are separate, as part of my identity they are inseparable. Just as what is true in parenting is often true in teaching, I can learn about my relation to my written work from my relationship with my child.
            To begin this conversation, below I suggest ten things that parenting has taught me about writing:

10. Comparison is the source of my discontent. Life is easier when I focus on my baby and my writing.
9. Anything goes – just so no one gets hurt. But sometimes we have to get hurt. Pain is a powerful stimulus for learning to take place.
8. It’s always easier when there’s a routine.
7. When something goes wrong, it will eventually be forgiven, even if it takes a ton of hugs and kisses.
6. Lots of people have done it, gotten through it, succeeded; and they all seem so successful and calm in the light of day. But they all have their sleepless nights. It’s how they respond to the anxiety and unpredictability that makes the difference.
5. I may have to do the same thing over and over again to get the desired result. But it may take a month or two or three to figure out what that thing is, and then it may change.
4. A creator and their creation are forever connected: it is difficult to leave my daughter in the care of another already – I can’t imagine sending her out into the world. I’m similarly reluctant to share my writing with others, and the world.
3. We were all babies once; every adult was once someone’s child. These adults who were once children are our readers, characters, and inspiration. At its core, writing is a humanistic activity, and I am writing my best when I am remembering this.
2. Feeding solves all problems.
1. Children are natural muses. Whenever I have writer’s block, I either look into the eyes of my child, or get down and try to look at the world through the eyes of my child. Either way, I learn something new.

In the past nine months I’ve experienced a steep learning curve: I’ve been trying to learn not only how to parent, but how to write and parent at the same time. I cannot help but think about my student who conceived her papers while washing dishes at the kitchen sink. Because she faced out the window while sudsing the glasses and plates, in these moments her children could not reach her, and she used this time to imagine her papers from beginning to end. Being a parent not only taught her to make the most of the time she had; being a parent transformed dishwashing into a sacred space where her intellectual mind could flourish. I know I have many other students and colleagues who know much more about how parenting has affected their ability to create. I encourage comments to this post to share what you have learned! Please add your own ways that parenting has affected your ability to write, create, craft, or work.

Works Cited

Graham, Steve and Joe F. Donaldson. "Adult Students' Academic And Intellectual Development In College." Adult Education Quarterly 49.3 (1999): 147. Professional Development Collection. Web. 7 Mar. 2014.

Moore, Jessie. “Mapping the Questions: The State of Writing-Related Transfer Research.” Composition Forum 26 (2012). http://compositionforum.com/issue/26/
. Web. 7 Mar. 2014.

Navarre Cleary, Michelle. “Flowing and Freestyling: Learning from Adult Students about Process Knowledge Transfer.” College Composition and Communication 64:4 (2013): 661-687. Print.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Need to Write? Head Outside.

In "Training Your Brain for Creativity," writer and fitness specialist James Fell passes along some wisdom that we can finally take advantage of now that one of the worst winters on record is finally coming to an end. A personal observation that his creativity improves while exercising outdoors--he says the bulk of his book was written while either on his bike or running--prompted Fell to talk with Ruth Ann Atchley, chair of the psychology department at the University of Kansas. 

"We've known for a long time that writers get benefit from being active out in nature," she explained. "The environment makes a big difference." And while it's long been established that aerobic exercise improves cognition, it's the combination of activity and the outdoors that's key: "Reading email and checking your phone takes you off task and inhibits creativity for as long as five minutes each time." In contrast, the "natural environment has the ability to seduce and attract your attention system rather than demand it." 

Exercise, outdoors or not, can also enhance your career. Fell cites neurologist Dr. Miguel Alonso-Alonso, who explained that a "fitter person is going to have greater improvements in executive function." Moreover, there may be a correlation between physical and financial health, with Fell reporting economist Vasilios Kosteas's finding that people who exercised at least three times each week increased their earnings: "I found that for men the average was a 6 percent increase on weekly earnings. For women it was more on the order of a 9 to 10 percent increase in weekly earnings," said Kosteas. 

To read the full article and in-depth explanations of the research, click here

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

April Is National Poetry Month

Yesterday marked the beginning of National Poetry Month. The celebration's organizer, the Academy of American Poets, has hundreds of suggestions for ways to celebrate. Here are a few highlights:   
  • Listen to readings of the site's most popular poems. (Click here to listen to the site's most popular recording, Dylan Thomas's "Do not go gentle into that good night."  
  • Explore the rich history of poetry here in Illinois. (Distance students, click here to find information about your state.) On each state-specific site you'll find biographies and the work of local poets, lists of "poetry-friendly bookstores," event calendars, information about local literary organizations and publications, and poems about the state, its cities, and its people. 


  

Monday, March 31, 2014

Writing Showcase Deadline Is Tomorrow!

The Writing Showcase celebrates the outstanding writing of SNL students. If you have received an “A” on a paper or glowing feedback on an Independent Learning Project (ILP), consider submitting your work to the Writing Showcase. You may submit up to three pieces of writing. By submitting your work, you not only share your accomplishment with others, but also provide inspiration to your fellow SNL students as they work on their writing assignments.  Excellent submissions will be recognized at the Spring Awards Luncheon.

Click here to download a submission form. Email your work and the completed submission form as Word documents or PDFs to snlwriting@depaul.edu.


Tuesday, March 25, 2014

The Wrong Way You Were Probably Taught Grammar

Yesterday Professor Michelle Navarre Cleary was a guest on Wisconsin Public Radio’s The Kathleen Dunn Show. During the hour she discussed, in short, the wrong way to teach grammar.

Many SNL students probably remember having to memorize parts of speech, complete grammar drills, and—perhaps the worst of all—diagram sentences. Research has shown, however, that teaching grammar before students are allowed to actually write is counterproductive, serving only to produce “people who are terrified to write.”

It is the rare person who steps into a writing course or approaches a writing project completely free of anxiety. “Writing is hard,” and “good writing is clear thinking,” Navarre Cleary explains. And sometimes, “it’s easier to worry about where the comma goes than to really push yourself to clarify your ideas.” But if you allow yourself to be challenged—by answering classmates’ questions about your work, your instructor’s questions, and your own—the grammar will follow naturally: “it’s in that effort to communicate that people start to learn what makes sense in terms of arranging their words in sentences.”

To listen to the full recording and hear more about why you should give yourself permission to quiet your inner copy editor, click here.

ALSO: Don't forget the deadline to submit to the Writing Showcase is April 1st! 

Friday, March 7, 2014

This Month's Incomplete Boot Camps

Do you have an incomplete grade? A final project that is dragging on? Finish your missing assignments, ILP, or AP through Writing Boot Camp and attend one or more free, faculty-led sessions. 

The program is designed for SNL students who currently have an incomplete grade on their transcript or students working on writing assignments. Sessions are set up to increase the likelihood students will complete necessary courses to obtain a bachelor’s degree and offer a supportive academic environment, writing assistance, and help with library services so that students can get assignments completed.

Refreshments will be served. 

Naperville
Saturday, March 8, 9:00 am-1:00 pm
150 W. Warrenville Rd., Bld. 200

Oak Forest
Saturday, March 8, 9:00 am-1:00 pm
16333 S. Kilbourn Ave.

Loop
Wednesday, March 12, 5:30-9:00 pm
Saturday, March 22, 9:00 am-1:00 pm
14 E. Jackson, Lab 1325

O’Hare
Saturday, March 15, 9:00am-1:00pm 
8770 W. Bryn Mawr Ave.

To Register: Email your name, DePaul ID# and the incomplete course title(s) you wish to work on to snlsa@depaul.edu at least 3 days prior to your desired sessions (messages to this email are reviewed by DePaul / SNL college faculty and staff only). 

Items to Bring to Session(s):  Please bring a flash drive, your copy of the incomplete contract, all prior assignment preparation, including research material, assignment instructions, and assignment writing format (APA/MLA). Please let your faculty mentor know you plan to attend.



Monday, February 24, 2014

Deadline for the Writing Showcase is Coming Up!

The Writing Showcase celebrates the outstanding writing of SNL students. If you have received an “A” on a paper or glowing feedback on an Independent Learning Project (ILP), consider submitting your work to the Writing Showcase. You may submit up to three pieces of writing. By submitting your work, you not only share your accomplishment with others, but also provide inspiration to your fellow SNL students as they work on their writing assignments.  Excellent submissions will be recognized at the Spring Awards Luncheon.

Click here to download a submission form. Email your work and the completed submission form as Word documents or PDFs to snlwriting@depaul.edu.






Friday, February 7, 2014

Dinner on DePaul: Writing & Publishing

Has all the writing you've done at SNL inspired you to continue writing after graduation? On February 11, DePaul students are invited to connect with alumni who have gone on to work in the writing and publishing fields. 

"Dinners on DePaul" provide you with the opportunity to enjoy a free dinner with DePaul graduates and discuss their experience in a featured industry. Whether you already have a set path in mind or are exploring different career fields, Dinners on DePaul are a great way to learn about job possibilities after graduating from DePaul. 

The dinners are free to attend, but registration is required. For more information or to register please email OARstudents@depaul.edu or call (773) 325-8941.


Dinners On DePaul: Writing & Publishing
Tuesday, February 11 at 6:00pm to 12:00am
Lincoln Park Campus, Alumni Center



Friday, January 24, 2014

Interested in Teaching English in China?

Below is an announcement from the Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences. Students interested in TESOL are invited to attend an information session on Thursday, February 6, at 5PM in SAC 301 (Schmitt Academic Center, Lincoln Park campus). More information can also be found here

Announcement
The Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse is proud to announce that we have established a direct relationship with the English Department at Huaqiao University in Xiamen, China.  This is part of a larger relationship that DePaul has been building with Huaqiao since 2012.  As a result of recent visits to Huaqiao University by WRD Chair Pete Vandenberg and the Coordinator of WRD’s Graduate TESOL Certificate, Jason Schneider, the two departments have established a direct pathway for DePaul students who complete the Graduate TESOL Certificate (http://tinyurl.com/wrdtesol) to teach Writing and ESL in China, starting in academic year 2014-2015.  Graduates of the TESOL Certificate will be preferred applicants for one-year teaching appointments in the Huaqiao English Department.

A full-time university teaching appointment is a valuable experience not always available domestically to recent graduates.  Teaching at Huaqiao can be a strong foundation for the U.S. college teaching market or doctoral study in a range of disciplines.   Furthermore, spending time working and living abroad can be an invaluable personal experience and is regarded as an asset by employers in many sectors.  Those hired to teach full-time at Huaqiao will receive free single-occupancy accommodations, paid insurance, a travel allowance, and other compensation in addition to their salary. 

The opportunity for this coming year is open to those who will have the TESOL Certificate in hand by summer 2014.  Current DePaul graduate and undergraduate students who may be interested in teaching at Huaqiao in this year or future years are invited to an informational session sponsored by Profs. Vandenberg and Schneider on Thursday, Feb. 6, at 5:00 in SAC 301.  They will talk about the Huaqiao University English Department, the details of the lecturer appointments and the application process, and the beautiful cities of Xiamen and Quanzhou.  They will also discuss options for DePaul students to complete the TESOL Certificate—a teaching credential recognized around the world—concurrently with their graduate work or after finishing an undergraduate degree.  For more information, see http://depaulwrd.wordpress.com/china/.  

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Suburban Campus Writing Groups: Update for Online Group

Writing Groups at the suburban campuses will begin this Saturday, January 18. Writing Groups are an opportunity for SNL students to give and receive feedback on their work. The groups are facilitated by a highly qualified UCWbL tutor, but the emphasis is on creating a collaborative learning environment rather than on individual tutoring sessions. Click here for more information on the Writing Groups. 

Update: An online Writing Group will also be offered this quarter. Detailed instructions are given below; you can also contact Edward Evins (eevans6@depaul.edu) for more information. 



Suburban Campus Writing Groups - Winter Quarter 2014

Naperville
Writing Group Facilitator: Marianne
Start date: 1-18-2014
Time: Saturdays, 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Room: 119


Oak Forest
Writing Group Facilitator: Kevin
Start date: 1-18-2014
Time: Saturdays, 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Room: TBD – Ask Receptionist


O'Hare
Writing Group Leader: Amanda
Start date: 1-18-2014
Time: Saturdays, 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Room: 303
Contact: agaddam2@depaul.edu


Online Writing Group
Writing Group Facilitator: Edward Evans
Start date: 1-18-2014
When: Saturdays, 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Location: Online - Google Hangouts
Contact: eevans6@depaul.edu 
 
 
ONLINE WRITING GROUP INSTRUCTIONS FOR PARTICIPANTS

1. To join the group, contact the Writing Group facilitator, Edward Evans, at eevans6@depaul.edu Make sure to provide the facilitator with your name and email address.

2. Check your Inbox for an email from your facilitator. It will include an invite to join the videoconference session. 

3. Click on the URL (NOTE: this link will redirect you to Google+)

4. If you don't have a Google+ account, you will be asked to create one (NOTE: for time purposes, please skip all the additional steps while creating your account).

5. Once you're all set, a notification will pop up on your screen asking you to join the session created by your facilitator. Click "Join" and you'll be online with your facilitator and other participants. 

6. Once you're live, notice on the left side a list of things you can do during the videoconference. Screenshare will be particularly handy, as it will enable you to share with your facilitator your desktop and/or desired resources (websites, Word documents, etc.).


7. If you feel uncomfortable sharing your live picture, you can always disable your camera by clicking on the appropriate icon on the upper right bar. Please let your facilitator know about this prior to turning your camera off for the session.

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Winter Quarter 2014 News & Reminders

Now that Chicago is recovering from the deep freeze and the quarter is underway, SNL Writing would like to pass on a few notes and reminders for Winter Quarter. 

UCWbL Relocating
The Lincoln Park UCWbL office is now located in the Schmitt Academic Center (SAC) at 2320 N. Kenmore, next to the Richardson Library. The online appointment scheduler will be available beginning January 10, and the center will open on January 13. The Loop office is still in 1600 Lewis (25 E. Jackson).

Digication
Beginning this quarter all WTC and WW students are asked to create their course portfolios using DigicationClick here to view the UCWbL's comprehensive how-to guide. All UCWbL tutors are trained in Digication, and both center locations are equipped with computers if you'd like to make an appointment to work on your portfolio.